TimTibbitts | About the Author
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About the Author

Early Writing Experiences

Born at Kent State University just before all hell broke loose, Tim Tibbitts grew up in Beaver County, PA;, St. Louis, MO;  and Cleveland, Ohio. At a young age he came to love reading. Tim made his first attempt to write in third grade, in the form of a small two-chapter “book” called Eight Little Men, presented as a gift to his great-grandmother for her 80th birthday.

Having collected ideas for stories, plays and novels throughout adolescence–but lacking the courage necessary to bring those ideas to fruition, Tim first experienced the thrill of a byline working as a stringer for a weekly newspaper shortly after college.

After a decade as an English teacher, Tim left the classroom to spend time with his young children, and over time had the pleasure of writing dozens of feature articles for newspapers and magazines including Oberlin Alumni MagazineBrown Alumni MagazineThe Cleveland Jewish News, and Crain’s Cleveland Business, as well as several articles for national children’s magazines like Highlights for Children

A Commitment to Fiction

Between 2004 and 2009 he wrote his first novel, Echo Still (to be published independently in January 2014).  In 2009, Tim set freelance writing aside to turn his attention to the dream of regularly writing and publishing fiction.

Currently, Tim is working on Playing Possum, a novel-in-stories set in Western Pennsylvania.  Playing Possum depicts some of the challenges faced by military families, including loss and addiction.  On the back burner is a novel based on his family’s coming-to-America experience.

Delighted after decades of delay to be writing fiction every day, Tim would advise young readers to “Read everyday. Write everyday. Don’t be afraid to follow any idea even if it leads to a story you don’t want your parents or your friends to read. And never—even for a second—allow anyone to convince you that you don’t have what it takes or that writing is something that only ‘other people’ can do!”